Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Project: Owl Creek Residence
Architects: Skylab Architecture
Location: Snowmass, Colorado, USA
Area: 4,200 sqft
Photographs by: Courtesy of Skylab Architecture

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Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture

Skylab Architecture of Portland has designed the spectacular 4,200 square feet Owl Creek Residence in Snowmass, Colorado. It has a very unusual, triangular floor plan which is made to respond to the constraints of the site on which the residence is built.
The strict constraints presented a challenge for the architects who, instead of allowing themselves to be limited by them, they used them as an advantage. The structure has been anchored into the surrounding environment and it opens up to create strong visual connections to the idyllic landscape.

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Anchored in a hillside with panoramic Snowmass Mountain views, the Owl Creek Residence was built as a shared family retreat. Site constraints were central in the design response, informing the spatial concept to triangulate to work with the existing sloping terrain.

The project vision was to create a collection of lodge-like communal spaces surrounded by naturally weathered and local materials providing an abundance of access to natural light, and minimizing visual separation from the outdoors. This all weather mountain retreat is about enhancing and recharging social relations and maximizing connections to the native environment. The shared residence was designed around the idea that a place can deepen the connections between people, families and the landscape they love.

Finishes and interior relationships were carefully crafted to draw the scenic landscape inward and extending the outdoor deck living experience. A central spiraling split-level arrangement allows for the living room, fireplace, bar and lounge to feel like intimate spaces with a communal energy. Terracing theater seating maximizes space within the stairwell working with the topography.

The strict height limitation and slope constraints of the site turned into an advantage by anchoring the structure into the landforms. The structure frames powerful views through two principal façades, maximizing the visual connection to the landscape at every angle. Strategic decisions in the frame and form allowed for efficiencies and functional benefits, including a triangular structural steel frame with car decking to minimize costs through prefabrication, and a roof slope to move water and snow downslope.

Compact and efficient private sleeping wings open up to expansive outdoor views at the lower level. Exterior spaces open interior activity to the outdoors including a triangular spa with an elevated deck and an expansive outdoor terrace right off of the kitchen. The Owl Creek residence provides a platform to gather in a shared living environment connected to their surroundings with purpose, deepening family connections.

Skylab Architecture

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

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Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

Owl Creek Residence by Skylab Architecture in Colorado, USA

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Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Project: Bolton Residence
Architects: Naturehumaine
Location: East Bolton, Quebec, Canada
Area: 1,500 sqft
Photographs by: Courtesy of Naturehumaine

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Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine

Naturehumaine have designed the Bolton Residence in the Quebec municipality of East Bolton. This simplistic 1,500 square feet Canadian home is elevated above a rock located on a rugged hillside. The two-story family residence consists of two structures stacked upon one another, where the lower story is a concrete block partially built into the slope.

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Having bought a beautiful plot of wooded land in Quebec’s Eastern Townships, the client dreamt of building a country house that would be in perfect symbiosis with its natural environment. This rugged, sloped site came to a natural plateau just below its highest point, becoming the perfect location to erect the house.

The house is characterized by two stacked volumes; a wooden clad volume anchored into the mountain supports a cantilevering ground floor volume above. This gable roofed volume raised into the air gives the sensation that the house is floating amongst the trees. Vast views of Mount Orford and the valley below are framed by a long horizontal strip window. The kitchen and master bathroom are carved out of a black volume at the center of the house dividing living spaces from the master bedroom.

Naturehumaine

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

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Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

Bolton Residence by Naturehumaine in Quebec, Canada

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Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Project: Davis Residence
Architects: Miller Hull
Location: Bellingham, Washington, USA
Area: 1,400 sqft
Photographs by: Benjamin Benschneider

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Davis Residence by Miller Hull

The Davis Residence is a 1,400 square feet home located in a densely wooded area on a cliff with a stellar view of the San Juan Islands. It is actually located in Bellingham, Washington, USA where it tries its best to blend in with the natural environment that surrounds it.
Miller Hull has designed the Davis Residence with an abundant use of wood throughout the interior as well as the exterior, creating a warm ambiance and a strong connection to its surroundings.

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

This 1400 sq. ft main house and guest house/garage is located on a heavily wooded cliff site with views of the San Juan Islands of Washington State. The plan orients to major views south down the coast line and west out to the islands while being careful to stay outside of the drip line of the dominant Doug fir trees. Large overhangs protect glazing and provide shelter.

The concept marries a long gently sloping roof form containing the kitchen, entry and studio with a vertical tower containing the living room and master bedroom above.

The roof forms express their timber construction with exposed joist, 1×4 skip sheathing and plywood diaphragms. The high performance wood fir windows provide thermal breaks while being strong enough for the mullions to be of minimal dimension. Wood T&G paneling is stained in bold transparent colors.

Miller Hull

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

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Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

Davis Residence by Miller Hull in Washington, USA

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River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

Project: River House
Architects: Suyama Peterson Deguchi
Location: Northern Rocky Mountains, USA
Area: 5,425 sqft
Photographs by: Aaron Leitz

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River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi

Suyama Peterson Deguchia Japanese architecture studio, has designed the River House in a sloped area of the Northern Rocky Mountains in the USA. This concrete home was built along a river in order to incorporate its two-story structure into the mountainous environment.
The River House, with its 5,425 square feet of living area, includes a guest wing and plenty of outdoor living areas that extend the home’s marvelous interiors.

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House is a serene shelter embracing the natural beauty of the rugged mountain area. The complex program for a retired couple included a guest wing and extended outdoor living areas. The site is located within an older cul-de-sac development above a meandering river and the challenge was to build a private oasis in this dense setting with a connection to the river and the surrounding scenic mountains.

An elongated concrete wall on the north side provides a structural backbone for the composition. All program elements were located on or below grade and under a sheltering shed roof to enhance the sense of protection in this sometimes harsh environment. Concrete was chosen as the dominant material for its durability and because it aesthetically anchors the design to the site. While visually extending the interior spaces and creating outdoor rooms, the raw materiality of the concrete sets up a compositional base for the remaining wood, glass, metal and plaster finishes.

When approached from the street, the house is very understated and minimal. Upon entering the house through the conceptual front door (gate), one finds a rich sequence of spaces, bounded by concrete and plantings. Here, the division between inside and outside first becomes blurred. This sense of uncertainty extends through the airlock entry to the interior of the main space. The synergy of the landscape architecture, art and furnishings contribute to the serene sense of place.

Suyama Peterson Deguchi

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

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River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

River House by Suyama Peterson Deguchi on The Northern Rocky Mountains

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Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Project: Malinalco House
Architects: Arquitectura Alternativa
Location: Malinalco, Mexico
Area: 1,474 sqft
Photographs by: Luis Gordoa

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Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa

The Malinalco House is a compact modern home designed by Arquitectura AlternativaThis single story residence is located on a plot surrounded by a natural environment in Malinalco, Mexico.
Being this close to nature, the architecture of the Malinalco House employs the nature that surrounds it as the primary element in its conceptual stage.
The interior features an open plan design blessed by natural light and sights of the dense green vegetation and shrubbery that surrounds the home in every direction.

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Today, direct contact with nature is more important due to the constant growth of urbanization, with the massive construction of houses or apartments for middle class families nationwide.

Malinalco House is one of those places where nature is an essential part of its conception, surrounded by greenery and framed by hills give it an atmosphere of tranquility and comfort. From the outset it was clear that the landscape around the house should be preserved as much as possible.

The project of this custom house started as a very simple program with only 2 bedrooms, living room, dining room and kitchen; framed with front terraces that give them amplitude. The materials used in the 137 m2 of construction, were selected precisely so that in harmony with the landscape they would unify the concept of “cottage” which is the purpose of this project. We designed a simple and austere technique that would generate both a contrast and a dialogue with the brightness of the exterior space and its surrounding nature, the adobe wall that stands embraced with wooden beams, with the pitched roof give the project lightness; inside, wood dominates on floors and walls giving warmth to the spaces.

We paid particular attention to the energy efficiency of the project. An efficient and compact structure has been designed with excellent insulation. These are all elements that make up the space, containing time and transmitting power, places of opportunity that due to their conditions and in a privileged climate, are potential carriers of activity in the living spaces.

It is a single level of light structure and modest size which with simple geometries presents a harmony in its natural environment. The arrangement of windows and doors improves access of natural light and ventilation and are the focus of the interior space as they extend the visual field to what the natural environment offers.

Arquitectura Alternativa

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

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Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

Malinalco House by Arquitectura Alternativa in Malinalco, Mexico

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Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Project: Villa G
Architects: SCAPE
Location: Sorengo, Switzerland
Area: 3,659 sqft
Photographs by: Francesco Mattuzzi

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Villa G by SCAPE

Villa G is a contemporary family home located in Sorengo in the district of Lugano in Switzerland. It was designed by SCAPE, an Italian studio who have built this home around contrasting volumes that rise up from the ground.
It is placed on a steep hillside plot that is near a protected wood. The parcel of land also opens up a partial view of the mountain ridge over the nearby lake.

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

The G family home in Sorengo, on the edge of Lugano in Ticino, is the category of villa that Palladio-1 put forward as a contrast with the town house. The site, a long narrow strip of land on a steep slope, is part of a hilly area, bordered on its short sides by a private road and another property.

On the long sides it is fringed by another site being developed and a wood that is legislatively bound. To enjoy the fine view of the mountains and part of the lake, the ground level must by raised by three metres. Iñaki Abalos would define Villa G as the product of pragmatism.

The spaces are articulated according to the client’s precise requests, such as the fact that all the main living spaces on the ground floor, with a second floor devoted only to a games room, guest area and the solarium with a heated pool. As a house, it is neither too large nor too small. There is room in it for all that is needed for each member of the family to live life autonomously.

The plan involves an interchange of open glassed areas and enclosed volumes to house the technical and service zones as well as the closed rooms such as the study. From the entrance, positioned just over two metres from the road, a long corridor crosses the entire main floor, broadening as it reaches the sitting room and dining area. The house is a system that is reflected in the spaces. Villa G has been designed so as to permit all the internal areas to open onto the wood: allowing architecture to become an environmental filter. A central patio increases further the important relationship between inside and outside.

The volumes, made up of load-bearing partition walls, are of different heights and emerge at the upper level to construct an artificial landscape that contrasts with the natural landscape of the mountains. The choice of materials is intentionally restricted; the walls are in pale cement treated with reflective paint both for aesthetic reasons and to protect them. Inside, the insulation is covered with white plaster.

Externally the house has been clad in local stone. Opaque aluminium fittings bring a contemporary touch to the project as a whole. Particular mention should be made of the realisation process. The pragmatic method ties together technical aspects and nature. From a technical point of view there is a merging with Swiss artisanship.

The metal sheet subtly working, resolves details related to dripping water. The formworks, thanks to a system created ad hoc for the house, hide the join marks so that the aesthetics of the cement walls are not compromised and to allow the parquet floor to be recessed without the need for a skirting board.

SCAPE

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

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Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

Villa G by SCAPE in Sorengo, Switzerland

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Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Project: Tumble Creek Cabin
Architects: Coates Design Architects
Location: Cle Elum, Washington, USA
Area: 41,450 sq ft (site), 3,835 sq ft (building)
Photographs by: Lara Swimmer

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Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects

The Tumble Creek Cabin is a recent project by Coates Design Architects, a studio already featured on our site for their Dorsey Residence project, located in the small town of Cle Elum, about a 90-minute drive east of Seattle, Washington.
This contemporary cabin is surrounded by a lush natural environment and although it is designed with entertaining in mind, the Tumble Creek Cabin is a “net-zero” home as described by the architects. It is designed to have an ultimately low impact on the environment.

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

This vacation home designed to be “net-zero” lies in a historic mining area in Washington State’s Cascade Mountains. The climate is extremely cold and snowy in the winter months and scorching in the summer. Situated in a master-planned resort community, the house blends sustainable modern architecture with reclaimed rustic materials. Repeat clients Ed and Joanne Ellis first hired Coates Design Architects for their home and primary residence on Bainbridge Island—the first LEED Platinum residence in Washington. They worked again with Coates Design who brought the same modern and sustainable design sensibilities to this vacation home intended to be a legacy piece for their extended family.

The extreme weather conditions challenged the design team to create a comfortable environment without the use of traditional energy consumptive cooling and heating systems. The team sited the building to take advantage of passive solar strategies and created an abundance of sloped roof to support a 10 kWh PV Solar Panel array. This system is designed to provide all of the electricity required by the home and is engineered to include a Tesla Powerwall. The Powerwall will store extra electricity and will maintain functionality during power outages as well as a vehicle charging station for the owners’ electric cars.

Coates Design Architects

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

An entry vestibule and mud room conserves energy and creates an elegant entry into the main living space. This self-contained room serves double duty as a special place to welcome visitors and an air lock to keep the outdoor elements contained. Wintertime’s chilly drafts and summer’s excessive heat are kept at bay with this simple solution. Dramatic cantilevered roof planes utilize passive solar strategies by barring the summer sun & heat yet inviting in the winter sunshine. These broad overhangs also create covered outdoor space, much coveted in this climate, and a sheltered entry experience.

Vaulted ceilings in the main living and dining area are supported by exposed steel and wood structural elements, and floor-to-ceiling windows look out on the landscape beyond. A large board formed concrete chimney commands attention as the focal point of the main living area. This solid mass, along with areas of concrete floor, serve also as a thermal heat sink to help maintain a stable and comfortable temperature inside. There are two primary bedroom suites and a bunk room in the main house to accommodate family members. A separate bunk house has space for recreation and an additional bedroom suite. The two-car garage features an electric vehicle charging station, a wine cellar, and plenty of storage.

Coates Design Architects

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

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SUSTAINABLE FEATURES:

  • High-performance rain screen building envelope with continuous exterior insulation
  • Over insulated roof beyond required Washington State Energy code minimums
  • Radiant floor heating and Energy Recovery Ventilation System
  • 10 kWh PV Solar Panel array, engineered for Tesla Powerwall battery backup system
  • Use of rustic materials, including stone, Cor-ten steel, and reclaimed barn wood with modern detailing
  • Exposed steel and wood structure throughout the main spaces
  • Radiant Heat
  • Heating and ventilation system can be monitored and adjusted remotely
  • Massive board-formed concrete fireplace
  • LED lighting
  • Energy efficient aluminum-clad wood windows and doors
  • Electric car charging station

Coates Design Architects

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

Tumble Creek Cabin by Coates Design Architects in Washington, USA

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Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Project: Cabin Vindheim
Architects: Vardehaugen
Location: Lillehammer, Norway
Area: 699 sq ft
Photographs by: Courtesy of Vardehaugen

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Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen

Architecture studio Vardehaugen have designed a snowbound cabin called Cabin Vindheim withing a deep Norwegian forest, near the town of Lillehammer. As you would expect, the region in which it is located is subject to heavy snowfall and low temperatures. As a result, the exterior is clad with black-stained pinewood featuring bold apertures cut into the facade. It also boasts large windows that provide views to the fairy-tale like environment.

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim is situated deep into the forest, in the alpine landscape close to Lillehammer / Norway. The cabin is inspired by the classic motif of snowbound cabins, which have only their roofs protruding through the snow. When snow covers the structure the division between architecture and nature becomes blurred, and the roof becomes a man-made slope for ski jumping, toboggan runs and other snow-based activities.

In spite of a compact floor plan (55m2) the cabin is spatially rich and generous due to the sloping roof and the various uplifts. From the main bedroom and the mezzanine you can even gaze up at the stars and enjoy the northern light, while lying in bed. When resting in the cabin’s bedroom, a large 4m-long window creates the impression of sleeping above the treetops and underneath the stars.

The building, which is composed of a large living room, a bedroom, a ski preparation room and a small annex with a utility room, is clad in black-stained ore pine. The interior is lighter, fully covered in waxed poplar veneer. The uninterrupted ceiling connects all of the rooms.

Vardehaugen

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

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Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

Cabin Vindheim by Vardehaugen in Lillehammer, Norway

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Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Project: Berry House
Architects: Modscape
Location: Berry, New South Wales, Australia
Area: 5,005 sq ft
Photographs by: Courtesy of Modscape

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Berry House by Modscape

Modscapean Australian architecture design studio, has completed the Berry House in the town of Berry in New South Wales, Australia.
This firm is known for their expansive portfolio of sustainable, custom built pre-fab homes. They even claim that each of their bespoke residences are completely ready to move in within twelve weeks.

The Berry House is a modular home that evokes an airy pavilion that is surrounded by protective walls. The project takes advantage of the surrounding idyllic forest, although the walls still protect the privacy of the residents.

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

The design brief of this impressive modular home was to create an airy pavilion that takes advantage of the views while providing a private haven from the busy road below. Rendered brick walls envelope the home to create a protective compound which not only provides privacy, but ensures the prefab home is secure. The home’s long, linear form takes advantage of the northern sun and connects to the idyllic bush and mountain landscape beyond.

The approach and transition into the home was an integral part of the modular design. As such, all of the services are concealed from view. Visitors enter via a large pivoting door that penetrates the wall. They then move through a timber battened walkway where dappled light from the courtyard filters through before entering into the double height entrance space. The main living zone opens out to the north-facing courtyard, encouraging afternoons by the pool lounging to the soundtrack of nature.

Meeting all the functional requirements of modern, sustainable design, the home has a total floor area of 465 sqm and consists of 11 modules with a large, open plan kitchen/living/dining area at its heart. A timber joinery core conceals services such as butler’s pantry, laundry and powder room and houses a staircase leading to an upstairs music room.

The finishes palette is minimal and modest with timber, concrete and zinc used in an uncomplicated manner create a design that is humble and nondescript. All landscaping, including the pool, was also coordinated by Modscape.

Modscape

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

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Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

Berry House by Modscape in New South Wales, Australia

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W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

Project: W House
Architects: ODE Architects
Location: Gyeongju, South Korea
Area: 3,207 sq ft
Photographs by: Youngchae Park

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W House by ODE Architects

The W House is a modern family home located near the coastal city of Gyeongju in South Korea.
It was designed by the South Korean studio ODE Architects in a way that it is surrounded by thick bands of fluted concrete that create a dramatic play of light and shadow. Furthermore, this 3,207 square foot residence spans across two stories and it is designed to respond to its environment between the city on one side and the mountains on the other.

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

The traditional Hanok seems to tells us that architecture does not have to be the protagonist. It shows that becoming part of a scenery by itself is an incredible feat and interaction with nature in all directions can happen effortlessly. Although unilaterally controlling the surrounding environment for a protagonist is interesting and exhilarating, it is also burdensome to the surrounding. As such power and tension seeps into architecture, a sense of supremacy is presented but at the same time a burden of not trying to taint its authority and control. This burden causes an incessant or abandoned unilateral struggle, but in a way, nobody wanted that struggle in the first place.

Continuous change through the multidirectional communication we possessed was what was aspired for W House, rather than a sold linear and unilateral appearance. Because nature is the agent of constant change, it is extremely hard for architecture to continuously change without forming an interrelationship with nature.

Although the obvious fact of depending on nature at times takes a whole new meaning, we must acknowledge this fact more in-depth if we are to muster the courage to let nature take its course and leave things be.

ODE Architects

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

Arrangement for the Garden

As befits its title as the repository of cultural heritage, Gyeongju gives off a strong sense of cultural symbolism as it is surrounded by layers of Hanok-style buildings and cultural assets. The plot of land in Gyeongju is vast and the gentle slope towards the southside allows for a comfortable and uninterrupted far off view of Mt. Byeokdosan. The building is stretched out towards the south, and partially protrudes out on the south and north entrance sites, providing space for a secure garden and backyard, and clear sense of direction with the surroundings. The main rooms are situated around the south garden and have open windows facing south. Service areas are placed on the northside to offer convenience and a sense of independence to the main rooms. The corridor is comprised of a long ceiling so that light seeping in through the space on both sides divides the space and accompanies people walking through the corridor.

ODE Architects

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

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Eaves form the Medium that Creates an Interrelationship with Nature

The eaves extend with the similar proportion to Hanok eaves. The eaves on the southside control the amount of the strong light that pours down for long hours, bridge the internal and external areas, and perform many other functions. The free formed eaves fall in line with the surroundings by softly and elegantly embracing the mountain terrain like the inside waist line of Hanok eaves, thus allowing the scenery to take in the building to become part of the background for someone looking in.

To allow for a deeper and more detailed relationship with the surroundings, curves are exposed in pattern-form on the concrete surface of the eaves, much like the size seen in Korean concave tiles.

Furthermore, the concave tiles and patterns project the movement of light as shadows, and subtly gives distinctness and clarity to the movement and existence of light. The interrelationship between the movement of light expressed by architecture and the expression of architecture through light will continue on as long as the building stays standing.

ODE Architects

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

W House by ODE Architects in Gyeongju, South Korea

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